I moved house. I pulled it off, which is good because I thought I might not, given how psyched out I am (depression, anxiety, stress, OCD, you name it, I got it). Here are some random observations I made in connection with moving and settling in:

  • Shower box is the most devilish device. Now I know why: I’m never cold when stepping out of a bathtub but always freezing when stepping out of the shower box. The difference must be in the construction: when having a shower in the tub, you heat up the whole bathroom; when showering in a box, you heat up the box and the room remains cool. On an unrelated note, as soon as I open the shower box door, the cat jumps in to lick the water off the tiles. Because soapy water is obviously tastier than the fresh water in her bowl.
  • Rubbish in the bin multiplies tenfold on its own. I throw one rubbish bag in the bin outside, come a few days later with another bag and find the bin filled to the top so that the lid doesn’t even close. So, it’s either that rubbish multiplies, or some bastard neighbour is using my bin.
  • Everything is falling on top of me. Literally. Because of the crooked floors in the flat. It required a great degree of ingenuity to support the wobbly furniture and I’m still somewhat anxious when I walk by that it will topple and flatten me. On the other hand, dying under a bookcase full of my favourite books isn’t a bad way to  go. The floor under my table is crooked so that my chair with wheels keeps on rolling away from the table. I’m considering gluing the wheels so they wouldn’t move.

Overall, my new flat is liveable, though not as comfortable as the previous one. I moved out of necessity rather than for the kick out of it – I couldn’t afford the rent, and I got a sympathy offer from a family member to take the empty flat in a tenement he owns and live there basically rentfree, just paying for the energies and a little extra on top of it. So here I am. I wish I were even more pleased that I didn’t end up under a bridge, but I guess I’m a depressed ungrateful bastard.

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Posted by Mara Eastern

I'm a sardonic blogger, snapper, scribbler and rhymer; a virtual space invader who indulges in cheerful negativism, morbid self-deprecation and bleak humour.

26 Comments

  1. As with me, you won’t always be there. Nothing stays the same. Change can be a good thing too. Look for the positive! ☺️☺️❤️

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    1. Thank you for your comment! Yes, like you say, I welcomed the change, thinking it might do me good. It could have done me good, but the change must always come from within. I’m practising looking at the bright side of things, and there’s always a bright side! I mean, who can say that they live practically rent-free 😉

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      1. Sounds like a great deal!

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        1. One gotta try, right 😉

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  2. I always hated moving, too. Twenty-five years in this house, come October, and I still don’t feel settled into it. We just got some tape-together moving boxes for me to toss things into, for Al to take to the dump grounds (at $12 a trip). Figure we can get all 10 loaded boxes into the car at once if we fold down the back seats.

    One does need a roof over one’s books and electronics. No getting around that. Is good to have family members in the area who have extra space.

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    1. Wow, that’s hard, still not feeling entirely at home even after so many years! I’m happy to report I’m settling in alrightish and it’s starting to feel like home already. I was very lucky to have a family to help me out, not just with the offer of a rent-free flat but also with the moving itself. I got rid of the moving boxes easily: I gave them to a family member who runs an online shop and will use them for packaging items. He was happy to have them 🙂

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  3. I’ve lived in some truly awful places, including an actual slum tenement, so I make myself remember that any time I’m annoyed about some aspect of the fabric of my home. So all I can advise is a mixture of making do and trying to accentuate the positives while trying to accept the negatives – easier said than done, I know, even when not dealing with depression etc.

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    1. You have my huge admiration for having lived (and survived) in a tenement! Thank you for your sound advice. You are right, of course, it’s all in the mind and there’s always a bunch of positive things to be happy about. The trick is to find them 🙂

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      1. I lived in three different tenement buildings in Edinburgh. Two were lovely (except for having to ascend three floors after working night shift) but one was an absolute slum.

        I hope it did not seem that I was making light of your current challenges. I definitely understand how difficult it is to live with biochemistry that tries to thwart and undermine us.

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        1. If having to ascend three floors is the worst thing about a slum, then it’s not that bad as I thought 😉

          No way, you didn’t make light of my post, quite the contrary, you gave me a reasonable advice. The challenge is in this case not as much to know what to do – but to actually make oneself follow my own and other people’s advice. I’m practising it.

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          1. Oh no. The three floors after a night shift were in a very lovely tenement building. I think I was on the second floor in the slum. It was awful. The windows were the worst. We used to pin blankets up across the windows to try and keep the weather out. It was also dark and horrid in many ways. But it was very cheap!

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          2. I see what you mean! Sounds really terrible. The cold is always one of the worst things. A cold flat is so not like home.

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  4. Moving sucks I know…but you are still alive and that has to be worth something….take care of you and tread lightly… 🙂

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    1. Thank you for the advice to tread lightly, a very good point 😉 The furniture is a bit wonky, but so far, so good, nothing has collapsed yet.

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  5. Well done for achieving the move 🙂

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    1. Thank you! I’m doing my best 🙂

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  6. My dog laps the water in the shower box too! Maybe they know something we don’t. But crooked floors? Seriously?! Maybe you could incorporate the rolling chair into your yoga routine… or not. Nice to hear from you again, Mara. I was missing you 🙂

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    1. Yes, there must be something about lapping water from the shower box that we don’t know! I’m not inclined to try it though. Actually, I am incorporating my rolling chair in my workout routine – I get a core workout anytime I try to position the chair so that the wheels would be sideways and wouldn’t roll! Then there’s the braking workout when the chair does roll. Lots of fun! 🙂

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      1. Yay! Always look on the bright side of life, da dum, da dum, da dum !!!!

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        1. Yay indeed 🙂 I should practise positive thinking more often!

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          1. Just a word of warning: it might become a habit 🙂

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          2. I wonder how that would be!

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          3. Try it and see !

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  7. Moving is a bitch. I probably will have to move soon too out of necessity: same problem as you.
    Here the floor is crooked too and it’s a bit annoying. When I sit by the computer, I have to connect myself to the desk with an arm or a knee (I sit in a yopga position on the chair while writing), if I don’t, then the chair will roll away from the desk with me on it…

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    1. It’s quite shocking that a person can’t earn enough to pay the rent. That’s obviously why people live in pairs, so they could split the cost. Something is rotten in the system.

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