In response to Laura Feasey’s Literary Lion challenge: Drink Me.

Long time nae see.
He stroked the bottle.
Ye cannae face life when yer dry.
Sammy took a gulp.
Ah’ll miss ye when I’m deid.

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Posted by Mara Eastern

I'm a sardonic blogger, snapper, scribbler and rhymer; a virtual space invader who indulges in cheerful negativism, morbid self-deprecation and bleak humour.

15 Comments

  1. Fab example of phonetics, I got such a sense for him and his speech. And what a tragic and grim story.

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    1. Awe, thank you a lot! I must admit I was stealing from the likes of Irvine Welsh and James Kelman. From the latter’s book How Late It Was, How Late, I even “borrowed” the character’s name… I have a thing about Scottish writing, so it’s my tribute to it.

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      1. Well you couldn’t find a better pair to steal from. I remember Trainspotting took me such a long time to get through when I was younger – the phonetics and all – but it was worth it! And there is nothing wrong with taking some inspiration from the greats, with your story it was well worth it.

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        1. Scots dialect is hard to read, more so for a non-native English speaker, but when I cracked it, it was so rewarding. Trainspotting is one of my absolute favourites, both the book and the film, and it’s a shame that it’s still mostly known as a sensation, not as a work of literature.

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          1. It’s one of my favourite films too, I love a lot of Danny Boyle’s early work! You’re right, although I’m sure Irvine has earned enough credit along the way, oh to be such a successful author!

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          2. You might just as well be on your way to become such a successful author 😉

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          3. 😀 Ahh, we shall see, we shall see. I am keeping the faith.

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  2. Clever – great accent 🙂

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    1. Thank you! It’s not really my cleverness, I just utilised what I learned from Scottish urban working-class writing… Including the accents. So, basically, I’m a plagiarist 😮

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      1. Well, you do it well 🙂

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  3. Brilliantly done! It’s almost like you can begin seeing him as he speaks without a single descriptor.

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    1. Awe, thank you a lot for your lovely comment! It was an experiment on my part, so I’m glad it worked out 🙂

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  4. Did you wrote this with an Irish accent? Cause I read it with one. Really fun

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    1. Scottish accent, actually, but close enough! Glad to hear you had fun.

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