Gallery

Mist

81 thoughts on “Mist

  1. Lovely gallery Mara,I especially liked the 1st one immensely πŸ˜€ Fogs hides so many things and yet brings the best out of so many others like this tree πŸ™‚

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  2. Why does mist add such sadness — or wistfulness — to ordinary objects? I find myself making up stories about the abandoned slide. (Have you read The Fault in Our Stars? Now, there’s an abandoned swing set story.) My favorite here is the “Red Rosehips,” but they are all intriguing, esp. the playground shots.

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  3. misty ambiguity?

    I just love these…makes me want to walk those fields….find myself lost in the corn…

    and what is strange is that on Sunday, when out walking, I took a shot of an empty child’s rocking horse (well actually it was more of an elephant…) in the mist in an empty playground

    It must be the mist…

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    1. It must be the mist indeed. It seems that mist amplifies one’s senses similarly as it amplifies sound. As long as that makes any sense. Looking to see your photos of elephant-cross-horse!

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  4. I pawed through these lovely and hauntingly beautiful images whilst listening to The Velvet Underground’s “Sunday Morning,” which seems to provide an exceedingly apt soundtrack for this fantastic post. Reminds me so of stark and stolid Sunday mornings, those abandoned mornings where one begrudges waking to the dingy, watery light pooling through the bent and broken blinds, dank and dripping with the dizziness of a cold, pale fog… (of course, I’ve never resented such mornings, but apparently some odd and clearly insane humans do)

    “It’s just a restless feeling by side. Early dawning, Sunday morning. It’s just the wasted years so close behind…Sunday morning and I’m falling. I’ve got a feeling I don’t want to know…Early dawning, Sunday morning. It’s all the streets you crossed not so long ago. Watch out, the world’s behind you.”

    How vividly I can relate, how potently your gorgeous and striking images seem to illustrate those painful words. I went over them several times. The colours, composition, that wonderfully wet fog, the black, withered apples- once so red with life! So many thoughts evoked, such emotion, such sadness. Excellent art. Thank you for this marvelous post. Smiling cheers,

    AJ Smiling Toad

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    1. What is the paragraph in the middle of your comment, the one in quotation marks? Is that your quotation of yourself or someone else…? In any case it is very forceful and apposite. I’m shocked that you managed to discover so much psychological depth in my series of snaps… I’m flattered to the extreme.

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      1. Apologies, I forgot to tag on where the quote came from har har! It is a quote from the lyrics of the Velvet Underground’s song “Sunday Morning”.

        I love the whole album. The album’s title is “The Velvet Underground and Nico” from 1967. I find the lyrics to “Sunday Morning” especially deep and meaningful and so dolefully true of my own existence.

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        1. My mistake, I didn’t read your comment properly and didn’t connect the song with the quote… Awkward! The lyrics are indeed very powerful. It’s only recently that I’ve been paying any attention to song lyrics and so far it’s been paying off. Like in this case. Thank you for the link to!

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          1. I am a weeeee bit obsessed with Norway. Well, here are the latest countries that I am obsessed with in order- Scotland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Netherlands and now Czech Republic. I am also a bit obsessed with the area surrounding Chernobyl. Here is a documentary that I will now fling at you- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kd0UcmoYpXI

            If you skip 49 minutes in, you will get to watch a scientist howl like a wolf, attracting them. It’s lovely.

            I am sure you were just DYING to see that πŸ˜‰ I aim to please.

            Best wishes,

            Autumn Jade

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          2. Are you freakin kidding me?! I’m saving to travel to the Chernobyl area! Seriously. It’s absolutely fascinating, plus I always wanted to see where the radioactivity that hit me in the early eighties came from. You mustn’t trespass there or go there without guide for security reasons, but you can go for a tour.

            Also, Scotland. My promised land…

            The video looks scary though. Why is it subtitled in Chinese or what?

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          3. HAHAHA!!! I cannot wait to go! Oh, do not fear the video- it is harmless. It is all about how nature is actually thriving there. It follows scientists around as they study the area. Subtitles were put up by the uploader who must speak that language. It is a PBS Nature show that airs here in the US. I found another version of it in Russian on YouTube. It is AMAZING in full HD, which I got to view it in when it aired here. I have been thoroughly obsessed since I saw it and am very keen on going there for one of those tours. YES I know that is definitely NOT the place to trespass without clearance!! πŸ˜‰ It is sooooo hauntingly beautiful and fascinating.

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          4. Yes, I’ve seen not this but a similar documentary on the nature thriving in the Chernobyl area. That’s precisely the thing that fascinates me about it. Oh, and the abandoned town of course. Saved the video in to-watch-later, will do.

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          5. Yes. I especially wish to see the way nature swallows up the remains of human existence- such beautiful entropy. Hope you enjoy the video. The filming crew must have had an absolutely thrilling time!

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          6. P.S. Sorry to hear your area was affected by the radiation. A major catastrophe, indeed. I had no idea nature could be so resilient in response to such high levels of radiation, however.

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          7. Hum, I sent the comment, yet I still find myself typing here…Ah whale…

            Right- glow-worms! I used to tell an ongoing series of stories to a crowd of school children in the elementary school playground many millennia ago. One character in the story was named after one of the audience members, and loosely based on the girl in personality. Her name was Christina. She happened to be the pawn of a detestable girl named Jes, in real life. Jes was the sort of lass that delighted in gossip and was in the habit of “ratting” or “tattling” so that she could gleefully watch on as a child was punished as a result. The character that I based on Jes was naturally a villain that ultimately turned into slug slime in the end. I don’t know how I did it, but I managed to convince both children that they should be flattered that they were characters in a story that turned into worms and slime. Children are such trusting creatures. I was clearly the true villain out of them all, I am happy to say. Telling them those ridiculous stories kept them quiet, and that was all I wanted. The raucous banter and loud happy noise of children was incredibly annoying to me.

            I have no idea why I just wrote all that to you…I have work to do, yet all I found myself doing was tapping away in a little rectangular comment space, yet again…Blast!

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          8. I might be the only person ever who hates glow worms. Because they are worms. I hate insectish creatures. If you hate the noise of children, I shall love your forever. I do too… Funny story by the way, the kids’ response is surprising to me! But then kids are silly. Because they are kids.

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          9. Har har I was very manipulative. Even as a child, I disliked other children. So, I would avoid them, or manipulate them. I have NO idea how I got them to bend so easily to my warped little will…they especially loved the random stories I made up, flattering or not. They actually settled down all around me and were perfectly quiet the whole time I was telling the stories. I really should get some kind of medal for inspiring children to be quiet at RECESS. πŸ˜‰

            Yes, the chaotic din of children is not a pleasant sound for me. Well, the obnoxious din of adults is not much liked, either. Bleh, especially young adults. I prefer the company of forests and ocean over the raucous, puerile, and vacuous company of a pack of young people (I do make exceptions for packs surfers in the ocean, though- they’re tolerable and pleasing to be around, especially as they frequently mistake me for some kind of sea-life- I LOVE being mistaken for a whale πŸ˜‰ ). Ah! There is such a peace and harmony to the sounds of nature, especially if there is the sound of rushing water in the backdrop.

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          10. Ha! You disliked children already as a child? What an interesting confession. I think I disliked people of all ages as a child. And continue to dislike them up to now. I love the sound of silence…

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          11. Such has always been my attitude, as well, my dear fellow misanthrope. I have always preferred the company of Solitude πŸ˜‰ There is no right or wrong, no good or bad- just blissful Silence.

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          12. I had a feeling you did not like them, but I just couldn’t stop typing! You are not alone. I know many, many people who want to flog me and throw me into a ditch every time I bring up some little insect-like creature or other. I get carried away. Glow-worm dolls were actually extremely popular (among parents to decorate their sleeping children with) in the late 1980s into the ’90s. They were absolutely hideous. Almost as hideous as those cabbage-patch dolls. They were gigantic green plush worm-things with hard, plastic little flesh-coloured kewpie-doll faces. Revolting. And I think if the child squeezed, the face glowed a bright red. Here is a marvelous photo for you- http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-1982-HASBRO-GLOW-GLOWORM-GLO-WORM-LIGHT-UP-DOLL-PLUSH-WORKS-RARE-L-K-/251740655389

            Is that not the most amazing idea anyone ever came up with for a child’s toy? It gets even better. There were glow-in-the-dark glow-worm books! I tried to scrounge up a photo with no success…I guess it was just too nefarious to post on the net…

            It is no wonder a number of children grew up to be terrified of tiny crawly things with wonderful toys and books like that.

            So sorry I must have just terrified you beyond words…or at least, I know I just did for myself. What a horrible nightmare to relive- I actually saw the things in real life. Not real glow-worms, mind you- that would have been lovely for me- but rather the possessed toys from the depths of the great Inferno. BLEH.

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    1. Awe, thank you, my humanoid wife! You’re free to steal the photos, I’m stealing them from other people in the first place anyway. *joke*

      I’m not happy with my winter blog makeover. The snow flocks are too cute and I’m not satisfied with my snow photos either. Always grumbling, always unsatisfied πŸ˜‰

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        1. A snow storm? Oh, as you discovered, I’m actually from Africa, not many snowstorms here πŸ˜‰ Will check if I can kidnap someone else’s storm for my blog. *off to stock photos*

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  5. Lovely mist photos, and I love mist and fog. I’d better, otherwise I would have a really hard time living here … in the fog capital πŸ™‚

    It adds so much mood to photos..

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    1. The fog capital! Haha πŸ™‚ That’s good. I’m glad to meet a fellow mist and fog lover, few people appreciate this weather condition and I think it deserves some love too.

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  6. I love that photo with slide. Especially the photo with the fog – makes it looks like an abandoned playground. I love how you accentuated the water drops around the rosehips too. They are like little crystals πŸ™‚ It must have been a cold morning there, I hope your hands weren’t freezing too much. This winter I wore mittens outside when it’s cold and felt fumbly with my camera πŸ™‚

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    1. Thanks for your as always lovely and encouraging comment! I admit to liking the playground photo too — I made a series of snaps on that location and like you, I was intrigued by the abandoned place, looking so dreary in the mist. We’re in the midst of winter here, so yes, lots of frost and some snow too now. I’m wearing fingerless gloves when shooting outdoors now. It’s not the ideal solution, as I’m bother somewhat fumbly and somewhat cold, but at least it’s something πŸ˜‰

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      1. I love fingerless gloves! There are lots of these gloves in Australia when winter rolls around here – we call them hobo gloves.

        It’s the worst, feeling cold when you’re out taking photos in winter. I remember going out to take photos of the fog earlier this year in the morning. It was 1’C and my nose turned red and was running the whole time πŸ˜‰

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        1. Hobo gloves sound like something I might not want to wear πŸ˜‰ But thank you for this interesting piece of trivia, I just love learning things via blogging! I’m scared for my life when real frosts hit and I’ll go to do some photos. I might freeze to death… But it would be worth the pictures!

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